Active BioHybrid Matter Lab

Professor Hyunjoon Kong

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Active BioHybrid Matter Lab

Professor Hyunjoon Kong

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Active BioHybrid Matter Lab

Professor Hyunjoon Kong

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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WHERE TO GO

Our Mission





Our group’s overall goal is to develop and study active biohybrid matters (ABM) systems that allow us to understand better and regulate interfacial and transport phenomena related to human health and sustainability. These ABMs range from nano/microparticles engineered with catalysts to soft material-based machines or energy harvesters and organoids that recapitulate and further forward the physiological function of tissue and organs.

To achieve this goal, we focus on the synthesis, characterization, and processing of ABMs with desired structure, property, and functionality. We also study an emergent behavior of these ABMs for (1) Design and fabrication of Active Micro-Motors and machines, (2) Engineering of organoids and microphysiological systems, (3) Micro and Nanomedicine for diagnosis and therapeutics, and (4) Stretchable and non-drying hydrogel.

Latest

Group News

  • Recent News
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Recent News

An NSF Expedition in Computing: Mind in Vitro-Computing with Living Neurons The NSF awarded a 7-year, $15 million project to a multi-university team led by UIUC. Professor Kong leads Wetware research which will integrate neural cultures on an engineered platform.

Yu-Heng's research image has selected in the SCS Science Image challenge and displayed at the Willard Airport.



Our group received NIH grant for "Dynamic circadian regulations of the blood-brain interface in a human brain-mimicking microfluid chip"

Group members attended the investiture of Professor Kong as the Robert W. Schaefer Professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering .


EunMi has received the best presentation award at 2021 UKC

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EunMi has received the best presentation award at 2021 UKC

Yu-Heng has received the 3rd place of oral presentation at the 20th Annual Graduate Research Symposium


Self-Propelling Colloids Enabling Biofilm Removals

Self-propelling antimicrobial microbubblers utilize hydrogen peroxide as fuels to penetrate biofilm structures while ejecting oxygen microbubbles.

The resulting microbubbles also collectively exert a mechanical force to disrupt biofilm integrity and, in turn, nullify bacterial resistance to antibiotics



Stretchable and non-drying hydrogel

Stretchable, non-drying hydrogels are in increasing demand for various biomedical and electrochemical applications.

Formation of novel, tough, non-drying hydrogels using a glycerol solvent exchange has led to the formation of a glycerogel that is stretchable up to 10 times its original length and remains hydrated for 6 months in ambient air. These novel materials can be used as mechanically durable, transparent electronic conductive materials, preoperative vascular surgical models, and more.



Octopus-inspired thin tissue transfer

A soft manipulator can manipulate and transport cell/tissue sheets and ultrathin biosensing devices seamlessly. The manipulator exploits temperature-responsive hydrogel layer to capture/release the objects by recapitulating how a cephalopd’s suction cup works.

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Meet our team



Active Biohybrid Matters